NZXT has introduced its new lineup of essential power supplies for gaming systems that promise high quality at reasonable prices. NZXT’s modular C-series PSUs will be available in 650 W, 750 W, and 850 W capacities that will also support the latest high-end graphics cards to drive gaming sessions, as well as Zero-RPM mode under low loads for quiet operation.

The NZXT C-series power supplies are made by Seasonic, which produces PSUs for numerous brands, and has a reptuation for building high-quality PSUs. Accordingly, the Seasonic-built units are using ‘high-quality components’ and are compliant with the ATX12 v2.4/EPS12V v2.92 specifications. The power supplies conform to the 80Plus Gold requirements, so they are they are mandated to be 87% - 92% efficient under a 50% or 100% load as well as 87% - 90% efficient under a 20% load.

NZXT’s C-series PSUs measure 150×150×86 mm and therefore they can fit into any ATX-compliant computer case, including smaller ones. All devices are equipped with a 120-mm fluid dynamic bearing fan that produces up to 32.3 dBA noise, but which can work in Zero-RPM mode (activated with a press of a button) when the load is light.

NZXT C-Series PSUs Output Specifications
  650 W 750 W 850W
Rated Combined Rated Combined Rated Combined
+3.3V 20 A 100 W 20 A 100 W 20 A 100 W
+5V 20 A 20 A 20 A
+12V 54 A 648 W 62 A 648 W 70 A  840 W
-12V 0.3 A 3.6 W 0.3 A 3.6 W 0.3 A 3.6 W
+5Vsb 3 A 15 W 3 A 15 W 3 A 15 W
Total Power 650 W 750 W 850 W

Rated for 650 W, 750 W, and 850 W, NZXT’s C-series PSUs can handle performance gaming PCs with one or two AMD Radeon VII or NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics cards (two high-end boards are supported only by the 850 W SKU), up to eight SATA drives, and three or six peripherals.

NZXT C-Series PSUs Connectivity Specifications
Connector type 650 W 750 W 850 W
ATX 24 Pin 1
EPS 4+4 Pin 1
EPS 8 Pin -
PCIe 6+2 Pin 2 4 6
SATA 8
4P Molex 3 6
Floppy -

NZXT will start sales of its C-series PSUs shortly first in the USA and then in the rest of the world. The cheapest 650 W model is priced at $109.99, the mid-range 750 W SKU costs $119.99, and the higher-end 850 W version carries a $129.99 price tag. The power supplies are backed with a 10-year warranty, which is becoming increasingly common for mid-range and high-end PSUs.

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Source: NZXT

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  • JoeyJoJo123 - Thursday, January 23, 2020 - link

    These look solid enough for both specs/price/warranty. Reply
  • Threska - Thursday, January 23, 2020 - link

    I have the 850 with USB so CAM works with it. So far no complaints. Reply
  • Obi-Wan Kenobi - Thursday, January 23, 2020 - link

    While I like NZXT products, and both the specs and looks of these are awesome, why not just buy a Seasonic PSU? Admittedly, I haven't checked, but I would think it would be a few bucks cheaper to buy a PSU directly from the maker, rather than a company that has to rebrand it, and then add a couple bucks to the sale price in order to make some money. Reply
  • JoeyJoJo123 - Thursday, January 23, 2020 - link

    It depends on current sales/promotion prices. Also, the companies aren't necessarily equal.

    While Seasonic may have the design/engineering/manufacturing expertise, they may not have as strong of a presence in NA or some other countries, so they may not have the logistics/quantity/marketing/customer service that other companies (your Corsairs, EVGAs, NZXTs, etc) might have. In some cases it may make more sense for Seasonic to make profit from having their designs rebranded by other companies since that could mean they don't need to expand into other countries/continents to still benefit from increased sale quantities, and they may not need to diversify their hires for more marketing teams/customer service/etc since the company rebranding the PSUs takes care of that themselves.

    It's most likely mutually beneficial for both NZXT and Seasonic to go this route, and it could also be beneficial for the customer, too.
    Reply
  • Operandi - Thursday, January 23, 2020 - link

    I think its kinda that but I also think they are just happy to charge more and make better margins for themselves as well as not upset their partners. Seasonic have gotten pretty good at product design and marketing but that doesn't mean they'll always want do it. Reply
  • Threska - Thursday, January 23, 2020 - link

    There are internally minor differences. Some related to CAM and the digital feature. Others tightening up a spec or two for compliance. Reply
  • EliteRetard - Thursday, January 23, 2020 - link

    I think I see a typo, images look like the C850 has two EPS connectors.
    Not sure about the others.

    Concerning that most of the connections don't appear to be keyed...meaning somebody could accidentally insert a cable in the wrong place/direction.
    Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - link

    "cheapest 650 W model is priced at $109.99"

    Cheapest... Man, these companies just love to continue milking customers for every single penny.

    ...and we keep buying.
    Reply
  • romrunning - Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - link

    This part is unclear to me:

    "All devices are equipped with a 120-mm fluid dynamic bearing fan that produces up to 32.3 dBA noise, but which can work in Zero-RPM mode (activated with a press of a button) when the load is light."

    Does that mean "Zero-RPM mode" has to be activated by physically pushing a button? If so, why isn't this just automatic (i.e. no fan until the load is enough to warrant it)?
    Reply
  • MASSAMKULABOX - Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - link

    750w PSU has only 650w on 12V line ... Typo Methinks?
    And shame on them for not producing a SFX 450 (gold?) at reasonable price .
    Reply

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